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Aeroic RedShift build

Motowncali

Member
Another prototype that I was happy to help build. Thanks to help from Dr. J, I was able to pull this off. I had to bend the wires for the elevators and sometimes figuring out the angles and measurements requires a lot of trial and error to get it perfect.
We used ballbearing trays on both the ailerons and flaps. This required me to trim he trays and do the ailerons first! I put the aileron tray into the wing through the flap opening and then slid it out into the aileron location. Please also note, that the mounting tabs on he servos used needed to be trimmed 2mm off each tab to fit into the servo opening. These are 10mm thick servos and it is recommended that 8mm thick servos are used. 2mm clevis are now supplied with the kits and the pin in the clevis fits the control horn holes perfectly. (Dubro or Sullivan 2-56 clevis esc have a larger pin.) On he supplied servo horn, I drilled the dimple in the arm out for a near perfect amount of throw with Z bends. The flaps give 90 degrees with ATV’s set at 100% aileron travel needs to be limited to 70% or it will over drive the wipers.
It is recommended that you cut a slot in the bottom of the fuse to put the ballast into the tube. Trying to pry the pushrods apart to slide ballast in is a pain. This prototype has round ballast, all production models have square ballast.
Pushrods for the tail in this prototype were also in the wrong location and this has been addressed as well.
Note: always sand the mounting surface of servo mounting trays, these are molded parts and not perfectly flat. There is mold release sprayed into a mold machine before plastic is injected as well. Scuffing and cleaning the inside top wing surface is always a good idea as well.
 

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Konrad

Well-known member
Very nice work by both you and Doc. What tools did you use to make those nice radiused bends in the V-tail arms?

All the best,
Konrad
 

Motowncali

Member
Stubby needle nose plyers. The trick I found to really nice bends is to bend slightly past what you want then bend back to where it needs to be.
 

Konrad

Well-known member
They're not round jaw pliers but rather standard "D"s shaped needle nose pliers? I'm impressed!
 

Wayne

Administrator
Staff member
I dare say that Mo has built more aircraft than the average builder. He does some darn nice work, and I am very pleased with the builds he has done for us. He is also an excellent pilot. I asked him to share his builds here to help others that may be able to learn a few things from him, the guy is a walking encyclopedia of ideas and hobby wisdom. We visited his home shop last night, I am always impressed with his setup. He has more supplies than many well established hobby shops, and all well organized and clean.

He is a good methodical builder, and darn dedicated to the job. Thanks Mo!

p.s. The V-tail linkage on this plane has been a bugger. Future versions of the plane will have a much more refined linkage thanks to feedback from Mo and some of the other early airframe builders. This green plane is the very first one pulled from the molds. It is very much an early prototype.
 

Motowncali

Member
Thank you Wayne.

And of course, anyone with questions about any of these builds or if you just have a hobby question, feel free to ask. I’m good at thinkin* out of the box and if I don’t know, I will say so, but then try to educate myself for next time.

Mo
 

Motowncali

Member
Dr. J. Was having figment issues with the torquerods in the tail of his Redshift. After trying to see if I could manipulate the original torquerods, I opted to remove and replace. I carefully used a propane torch to heat up the rod. This burned and melted the epoxy. I was then able to grind away a little more epoxy to fit new torquerods in. Please note that the new rods pictured fit and more much better than the original rods shown above in the build thread. The angle is closer to 80 degrees instead of the 52 degrees originally called for. I believe that all production Redshift will come with brebend preinstalled torquerods. Thank you Dr. J.
 

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Konrad

Well-known member
I too like the bright and varied colors. Having been a judge at a few races it really helps if the planes are of varying motifs, particularly when they are in close proximity to each other

Also as a pilot peering into the vast grayness that is often a contest day, I can tell you white and gray models don't show up against the humidity in the air. While I know one needs to "sell" (move) the product. Guys need to select (demand) that the pre finished model be visible in the air. Low visibility gray camouflage should stay the domain of the modern military. Our weapons for the FAI arena need to have the color of the old military parade banners.
 
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I too like the bright and varied colors. Having been a judge at a few races it really helps if the planes are of varing mortifies, particularly when they are in close proimity to each other

Also as a pilot peering into the vast grayness that is often a contest day, I can tell you white and gray models don't show up against the humidity in the air. While I know one needs to "sell" (move) the product. Guys need to select (demand) that the pre finished model be visible in the air. Low visibility gray camouflage should stay the domain of the modern military. Our weponds for the FAI arena need to have the color of the old military parade banners.
Aha!

You wantee grey camo - me makee grey camo...you wantee HP pink camo - me makee HP Pink Camo.

Whatyou wantee es whatimakee.

But...remember that if you want a special colour scheme, then you will have to hit Wayne with a multiple order. Otherwise it rally disrupts production.
 

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Konrad

Well-known member
No, I don't want gray camo!:eek: But if that sells that's the customer's issue!:rolleyes:

From a practical view point I like the Hot Pink. And from an aesthetic perspective I like the yellow black and red.

As I recall the military did some studies to both test for low and high visibility color schemes. Yellow and black ranked very high for high visibility.
 
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Wayne

Administrator
Staff member
Well, we didn't have any production planes until now. We have a special order all black with some red double carbon about to leave the shop, what a beauty! I think we have 3 coming in on our next order and they are all sold too. We do need to add them to the site. But if you are interested, please email us. They are $1300 for single carbon and $1400 for double carbon. If you need the crazy plane, we can get the tripple carbon for you @ $1600. Available in a few color options and paint schemes.

They are a cutting edge F3F design that is very different than the others on the market. As you can tell from the photos in this thread they are not another look-a-like F3F plane. Those have been lucky enough to fly a production plane have come away very impressed. The UK F3F team are flying those pink ones this year. :)
 

Konrad

Well-known member
Was that a Redshift you were flying at the ISR? It looked faster than the other F3F ships in the air while sport flying. I didn't see it on the race course. But it looks to have real potential!
 
Hi Konrad, it was indeed a Redshift flying, and in fact it was the first test plane out of the moulds so is all made from Glass.

But, I'm happy to say, bend it did not.

UK guys tried the Redshift at the weekend against all of the available popular F3F planes. Its faster.

Cheers,

Doc.
 

Konrad

Well-known member
What I saw was an unballasted Redshift bird flying at the ISR with a few ballasted F3F ships and the Redshift looked faster. The 19:1 aspect ratio wing looked stiff, but the bird wasn't ballasted. Glass or not the sine wave webbing looks to be adding a lot of torsional control. This can only become stiffer still when built with carbon.

Sine wave webbing is well proven in many full size composite aircraft structures. I think you are to be given credit for bringing this to our models.

All the best,
Konrad
 
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